300 from across U.S. turn out for Net Inclusion 2018

Professor Susan Crawford addresses Net Inclusion 2018. (NDIA photo by Valda Lewis Photography)

The National Digital Inclusion Alliance’s annual conference, Net Inclusion 2018, wrapped up Thursday after three days of workshops, tours and networking that drew three hundred participants to Cleveland from twenty-seven states, DC and Canada.

The keynote speaker was Harvard Law Professor Susan Crawford, former Special Assistant to President Obama for Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy, and a frequently published writer on issues of technology policy and fairness. Professor Crawford spoke following the first showing of a new video, “Dividing Lines”, highlighting the impact of Internet access disparities in American communities; the video features CYC director Bill Callahan describing AT&T’s digital redlining of Cleveland.

The entire Net Inclusion 2018 keynote session, including “Dividing Lines” and Professor Crawford’s address, can be seen here. Read more

Latest FCC data shows rural and inner-city Ohioans share a broadband problem

Ohio politicians looking for an issue that unites the interests of Ohioans on both sides of the “urban/rural divide” should take a long hard look at this map.

(Click on the double arrow on the left side of the map to enlarge it.)


The map shows the Federal Communications Commission’s newest Form 477 data on the percentage of households in each Ohio Census tract with “fixed” Internet connections (cable modem, DSL, fiber, satellite) that provide download speeds of 10 mbps or more.  The data is from December 2016 and was released on February 18, 2018. Read more

Dems: What about Ohio cities’ broadband gap?

(This post was updated on March 28 to reflect the approval of Substitute House Bill 378 by the Ohio House Finance Committee on March 21.)

A year after CYC and NDIA first documented the extent of AT&T’s digital redlining of Cleveland neighborhoods, big-city Democrats in the Ohio General Assembly are lining up to support a proposed state grant program for community-driven high-speed broadband investments to fill access gaps left by private providers.

But their own cities and neighborhoods need not apply. Read more